BEEF SPOTTER
Posted Tue, Nov 09 2010 03:47 PM CST
RICKEY HULL
GLENN HULL TRUCKING
FORDYCE , AR

Posts: 10
I just wanted to ask some of you experienced hands if you used tools such as the Beef Spotter Atlas. I am going to be hopefully starting to haul cattle soon and just trying to get some advice on what works best for you. I have driving experience 11 years flatbed, but I have been out of it for a couple of years now. Thanks for any and all help. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Wed, Nov 10 2010 12:12 PM CST
JUDD KAISER
J&S EXPRESS
WINNER, SD
605-842-6182

Posts: 1
Yes, I believe it is a great tool in finding feedyard and so on however some info in Beef Spotter is not 100 percent corect due to maybe change in ownership of a yard or something like that has not been updated yet. Over all definetly worth the money spent. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Wed, Nov 10 2010 07:02 PM CST
RON JOHNSON
RED BONE FARMS
, OK
580-465-8798

Posts: 2
BUY A BEEFSPOTTER!!!!!! Very good investment. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Wed, Nov 10 2010 08:40 PM CST
RICKEY HULL
GLENN HULL TRUCKING
FORDYCE , AR

Posts: 10
I went ahead and ordered one and I have already gotten it in the mail. I thought it would be a pretty useful tool. Glad to hear the positive feedback on it.
What kind of things do the sale barns, feed lots and ranchers look for in a driver. I know the company I am going to work for has some steady customers
and some of the drivers are asked for by name from these places. So, I am wondering what quality of a driver and person in general do these folks want
to come back to haul for them. I am not trying to make myself sound like a rookey but I do want to do the best I can for this company and for the buisness
as well.
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Posted Sat, Dec 25 2010 10:05 PM CST
ROBERT "ROBBIE" DEES
GEORGE WASSENAAR TRUCKING
ONTARIO, CA
951-317-6651

Posts: 14
Dont show up wearing shorts or flip flops!!! REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Mon, Dec 27 2010 12:32 PM CST
CRAIG W. WOLF
MORGAN FARMS ENTERPRISE, INC.
UTICA, NE
402-641-4143

Posts: 2
The best advice I could give to you is be on time, polite, and courteous. Be ready to lend a hand, but help only if asked- some places have their own systems that you and I are only in the way. You seem to be doing some home work, so that is good. Be as knowledgeable as you can. Be quick with your math, if it takes you 10 min to figure out how many cattle you want for the nose of your trailer, the cowboys at the feedlot will have the trailer loaded for you and be chasing you off the chute before you can get your overshoes off. Always get a count on your cattle, know what's in the box. It's tough sometimes depending on chute configuration, but watch the shape the animals are in as they load. Some places will slip a lame one in on the back, or a sick one in on a hot day or long trip hoping it goes down and then collect on insurance. Don't mean to scare you, but I've had it happen when I should've been paying closer attention.

I like to be at places I load at an hour ahead of time if I can afford it, especially when it is new to me. It leaves a little time incase you get to the place you think you're loading from, but it turns out you need to be at the "west yard" or "south chute" generally speaking, and the differing location is 20 min away or something. Sometimes its makes the difference on if you get the split load or not if there happens to be one.

I pencil notes down in my beefspotter of things like that. There is also some sale barn and packing house information in there that I note as well, for instance, what CB channel the guard shack is on at different plants and so forth. A notebook of different places you go with information or instructions/directions can be a handy resource if you take the time to keep one and make it current and accurate.

I hope some of this is helpful. I've only been in this for about 3 years now, and I have tried to pay attention to the veterans in the trade- Try not to learn the bad habits ( ha ha ), and don't ever think you've seen it all. You'll learn a new trick or time saver or something when you go to a new place or haul with someone you've never hauled with before if you keep your eyes open. You'll have your own ways you'll get set in to also, not wrong, just different. You might like standing on the chute while the cattle load the top, the next guy might climb up in the trailer as they go up the ramp.

Lastly, you don't have to speed, do pills, or drive all night 8 days a week to be a "bullhauler". Drive hard, rest when you need it, and stay on time. Don't be afraid to ask questions- You'll do just fine.

As my Father-In-Law say before I leave with the truck, Happy Truckin'!
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Posted Mon, Dec 27 2010 08:19 PM CST
JIMMY GRISSAM
J&B CATTLE COMPANY
DUNCAN, OK
580-656-7954

Posts: 1
every one wants to be a big boy to haul cows REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Tue, Dec 28 2010 07:59 PM CST
GREG WEBER
GREG WEBER TRUCKING INC
FORT BRANCH, IN
812-449-6998

Posts: 12
you also don't need a BIG hat & spurrs !!! livestock hauling is a lifestyle / how bad do you want it!! GOOD LUCK, HAPPY TRAILS REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Wed, Dec 29 2010 04:11 PM CST
RICKEY HULL
GLENN HULL TRUCKING
FORDYCE , AR

Posts: 10
I appreciate all the advice guys. Trucking lifestyle is in my blood and wanting to haul cows it just something I have always wanted to do. Flip flops are for showers and cowboy hats and spurs are for cowboys. No disrespect intended. Can't wait to finish up my time in the military and get back to the life I love. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Sat, Jan 08 2011 08:57 PM CST
COLLEEN GOODRICH
JUST TRUCKIN
CHIPPEWA FALLS, WI

Posts: 12
Originally Posted by: RICKEY HULL
Quote: "I appreciate all the advice guys. Trucking lifestyle is in my blood and wanting to haul cows it just something I have always wanted to do. Flip flops are for showers and cowboy hats and spurs are for cowboys. No disrespect intended. Can't wait to finish up my time in the military and get back to the life I love."

Always load your Nose NEVER leave it empty. if you are getting 1 cow for 2000 miles put that bitch in the nose.. it is not a seasonal thing it should be done year round. in the summer it puts the weight on your back so you can climb a hill better in the winter time it puts the weight on your drives to hold you to the ground.
the 3 most important things to remember when hauling cattle is be
1. able to out run anything that may come after you.
2. jump higher then they can if you can't out run them
3. SCREAM like a girl just in case you are trying to load by yourself someone just may hear you and come to help

do not try to drive faster then you can handle. gate the top to limit the movement of the animals. Always know your animals. lame, slow, or sick can ruin a good run really fast. Finding places to have them pulled is few and far between. it costs on average $102 to get a dead cow pulled at a barn and that is expected at the time it is pulled.

DO NOT let anyone else tell you how to load your cattle or hogs because they have been doing it for 20 years take their advice weather you decide that you want to load your trailer their way or not.

Hope this helps you and all any of us can do is give you advice since none of us can show you how we do it.
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Posted Tue, Jan 11 2011 11:04 AM CST
RICKEY HULL
GLENN HULL TRUCKING
FORDYCE , AR

Posts: 10
Thanks for the advice Colleen. I really appreciate it. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE