ELD MANDATE
Posted Sat, Oct 28 2017 08:26 AM CST
JEFF FERGUSON
INTERMOUNTAIN LIVESTOCK EXPRESS, LLC
BOZEMAN, MT
406-586-1648

Posts: 10
The time to effect change on this was during the comment period, a long time ago. I have been talking to feedlots and truckers warning them of this industry changing rule for over a year. Everyone responded we will see what happens....well its happening. So now it's jump on your congressman and get this stopped. That's unlikely at this late date. The ELD rule is simply not realistic for some segments of the trucking industry, not just livestock hauling. Who sleeps 10 hours anyway? No one. The best the affected segments of the trucking industry can hope for, in my opinion, is an exemption tied to an 8 hour split sleeper berth, 15 hour driving day, 150 mile no log at trip start. Since there is no common sense or willingness to work for industries in DC this may not happen either. An uncomfortable ally in this my be HSUS. They surely have a very strong lobby and would not want livestock standing on trucks around the nation for 10 hours. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Tue, Oct 31 2017 09:03 AM CST
ELLIOTT CORUM
ELLIOTT CORUM
LEXINGTON, KY
270-819-9255

Posts: 12
Originally Posted by: JEFF FERGUSON
Quote: "The time to effect change on this was during the comment period, a long time ago. I have been talking to feedlots and truckers warning them of this industry changing rule for over a year. Everyone responded we will see what happens....well its happening. So now it's jump on your congressman and get this stopped. That's unlikely at this late date. The ELD rule is simply not realistic for some segments of the trucking industry, not just livestock hauling. Who sleeps 10 hours anyway? No one. The best the affected segments of the trucking industry can hope for, in my opinion, is an exemption tied to an 8 hour split sleeper berth, 15 hour driving day, 150 mile no log at trip start. Since there is no common sense or willingness to work for industries in DC this may not happen either. An uncomfortable ally in this my be HSUS. They surely have a very strong lobby and would not want livestock standing on trucks around the nation for 10 hours."

I agree. It's coming and there's no stopping it or delaying it. Guys want to gripe and whine about it but are doing nothing to prepare for it. There are some things that are worth the effort of fighting back against; this ELD mandate is not one of them. We can't beat 'em, so we might as well join 'em, and we better start prepping right now for how we can manage the longer hauls since we'll have no choice but to stop part-way through. Drivers who are hauling feeder calves from the east to the feedlots out west need to start figuring out where they're going to shut down at about 500 miles into a trip. For an easy example of mileage, Lexington, KY to Salina, KS is 750 miles. With paper logs, I can make that trip and turn around and come back, no problem. With an ELD, however, just making the trip one-way will not be possible. I would have to stop somewhere in MO, figure out what to do with the cattle on the trailer, then complete the rest of the trip after my 10-hr break. So, what are my options when I have to stop for ten hours while loaded? Option 1 is to just leave them on the trailer. Option 2 is to meet a truck at my stopping point, offload them onto that other truck, and he can finish the trip. Option 3 is to offload at a holding facility somewhere, then reload after my break. Which is the best option? I honestly don't know. Options 1 and 3 keep me on the load so that I'll get paid in full for it, but they both add time, stress, and additional risk factors. Option 2 keeps the cattle moving on their way, but the $$ needs to be split appropriately between the two trucks, and I see problems there. I hope we can all wisely adapt to the new regulations and work together to make everything work smoothly. I doubt that will happen, and time will tell who the smart businessmen are and who wants to keeping complaining and playing the victim. Good luck to all.
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Posted Thu, Nov 02 2017 11:23 AM CST
JEFF FERGUSON
INTERMOUNTAIN LIVESTOCK EXPRESS, LLC
BOZEMAN, MT
406-586-1648

Posts: 10
When a truck stops and unloads to feed and water while on 10 hour break, who pays if one keels over dead?, or a calf gets out and gets hit in traffic and someone is injured? Who's liable for that? Who pays feed and yardage? Feedlot says I'm not standing it....so trucker stands it? And what sale barns or lots are going to become feedlots for cattle in transit?? Few or none in my opinion. Feed and yardage will be have to be paid before cattle reload so how will be that be handled? PayPal?? And what about the killer cows that can barely walk on the truck once, let alone twice?? It's a huge can of worms. The people sitting behind a desk have no idea about the complexities of livestock hauling. None. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Fri, Nov 03 2017 06:31 AM CST
JIM XTX
XTX INC.
BILLINGS, MT
406-855-7800

Posts: 14
I totally agree with you Jeff everyone is in denial. A delay is just a temporary solution and that's all . Every time there's a fatality truck accident we are getting closer to on board camers and mandatory sleep apnea testingELd are just the beginning REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Fri, Nov 03 2017 07:59 PM CST
KENNY RAY
4C TRANSPORTATION
GOTHENBURG, NE

Posts: 4
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Posted Fri, Nov 03 2017 08:01 PM CST
KENNY RAY
4C TRANSPORTATION
GOTHENBURG, NE

Posts: 4
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Posted Fri, Nov 03 2017 08:02 PM CST
KENNY RAY
4C TRANSPORTATION
GOTHENBURG, NE

Posts: 4
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Posted Thu, Nov 09 2017 05:05 PM CST
BLESSED HOPE TRUCKING CO.
BLESSED HOPE TRUCKING CO.
SPRING GROVE, MN
612-716-7611

Posts: 6
This is the letter we submitted: Please feel free to cut and paste any portion you feel reflects your views into your Formal. Comment. As owners of a livestock hauling business and on behalf of our owner operators, we voice our opposition to the New Hours of Service and the implementation of the mandated use of ELDS. It is obvious to those of us who are in the livestock hauling business, that these new regulations will have devastating effects on the livestock trucking industry as well as the agricultural community that we serve. These regulations have not been thought out in a reasonable manner. Problems: 1.These new regulations have not made allowances for the variables concerned with live freight hauling. 2. If we are to comply with said regulations then at the very least the government needs to provide the means to rest livestock no more than 6 hours apart in any direction. Which would include: real estate for rest area, facilities that can manage hundreds if not thousands of head that need feed, water and climate control, bedding and manure handling, USDA inspectors, as many loads are sealed from origin to destination, a veterinarian on site, pollution control management, qualified & certified animal handlers. These are only a few I can think of. 3. Parking for trucks, potentially 1 to 100 trucks in any given rest area, depending upon variables that could probable never be anticipated. 4. Ideally the government will take financial responsibility for livestock while in their facilities, along with managing crossing state lines disease control regulations and identification, sickness, livestock with broken legs from the extra unloading and loading, allowances for loads that may have a need for several pens as many loads have multiple owners or livestock that cannot be mixed, a rest area staff to keep track of every head(as I assure you the USDA is going to demand). 5. And let's not forget the amount of time that will be burned up for drivers waiting in line to unload and reload livestock. It could potentially be several hours in a busy rest area. And the questions remains even if this was a possibility who is going to cover the costs. One would hope that our already over regulated, under paid truck drivers, would not have to take on this burden as well. 6. Privacy concerns for our drivers. I would offer the suggestion that ELDS fall into the category of government overreach at the least and just plain illegal at best. What next, are you going to make us take a government official along in the truck to make sure we are complying with these mandates? And would someone just answer the question "is this all absolutely necessary??? Why not follow President Trump's lead and stop with the attempts to regulate every little detail. It is time to deregulate not implement more! And just to be clear I am in no way advocating rest areas, it makes far more sense to leave something alone that is currently working and not regulate it to the point that this becomes necessary. Thank you for your time. Sincerely Randy & Larie Wohlert Blessed Hope Trucking Company Hauling livestock since 1994 REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Mon, Nov 13 2017 10:23 AM CST
TONY BROCK
TBROCK, INC.
LINCOLN, NE
402-730-9333

Posts: 1
A few weeks ago, a TX Congressional Representative offered a bill to stay this mandate for 2 years. He was looking for co-sponsors. Nebraska Representative Fortenberry refused to co-sponsor this bill, effectively supporting the ELD mandate. Senator Deb Fischer will not even take my calls on this issue any longer. These are both Republicans, so remember that during the next election. It is the GOP Congress that is screwing us small business owners on this ELD Mandate issue, plain and simple. Many Democrats are also on this bandwagon, too. So, the only answer is to vote out current members of Congress and to support those who support us. If the next ones do not support us, they need to be one-term members, also. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE
Posted Mon, Nov 20 2017 09:20 AM CST
SCOTT VIEGUT
SA&S TRANSPORT
HOT SPRINGS, MT

Posts: 4
Off loading at a resting facility of some sort sounds great until you do the math on how many cattle move even just on highway 212 east. Assuming that 150 trucks carrying 90 head each go through Broadus each day need a resting place. That is 13,500 head needing pen space, feed, and water. This is almost laughable when you think that this many loads and cattle can be moved into and out of any facility smoothly on a daily basis. The areas that have open land areas that would support such a venture, do not have the available water and feed resources to support the same. Water assuming 20 gallons per head would require 270,000 gallons per day just for drinking. Forage would be in excess of 100 ton per day. I don't see any state allowing these type of transient livestock transactions and facilities to be put in. States are going to want to do another health and brand inspection as they are loaded out. Then surely someone will put cattle into pen b 6 and be brought cattle out of d6 at some point. Sale barns will not be any where close to sufficient to cover this need, you are lucky if you can find a pen in most before their sale if you have a break down and need to off load a truck. You would think that our government representatives for agricultural states would want to look out for their states main industry, however that does not seem to be the case. When the cities are facing 20 bucks a pound for cheap hamburger, or there is none on the shelves to buy maybe then there will be movement on this. REPLY REPLY WITH QUOTE